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20121207
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that. this is why president obama extend the tax rates for a year action because he said this could hurt the economy. here we are again. we're not anywhere different than we were last year really. >> gregg: donna, dick durbin, the senate's number two democrat, said that social security is off the table because i'm going to quote him here -- it does not add a penny to our deficit. that's ludicrus. >> i think that i'm unable to comment because i think the context may have something to do with the sense of lock box and where this money actually comes from and where it sits in the meanwhile before it gets spent. but i also think it's awfully important to remember that in terms of republican cooperation, the president really has been i think very sincere about seeking that cooperation and initially speaker boehner i think expressed with great sincerity his interest in cooperation. i dare say that there has been a lot of biplay among both the senators and the house members on what that cooperation is going to look like. but i do think it's awfully important that we not come out of this pr
in savings when it comes to tax revenue. but much of that came from raising tax rates for the wealthiest americans, which of course is what president obama campaigned on. so those are the big differences right now. but this certainly is important, wolf, because republicans were saying that they're not even sure that this ball was in their court. clearly they realized it was. so the talks -- there is stalemate no more, put it that way. >> on this key issue of marginal tax rates for the wealthy, the republican offer is keep the tax rates exactly as they are right now, 35% for that 2% wealthiest families making more than $250,000. the obama proposal is raise that rate to 39.6% where it was during the clinton administration. what else is in this new gop proposal? >> reporter: let's show you some of the savings when it comes to government spending. first of all, they put about $600 billion in what the republicans are calling health savings. we understand -- we don't have details. we understand much of that comes from medicare, things that we've heard from republicans over and over like raisin
to compromise it out. you don't increase the rates as much as obama wants. you do some stuff on deductions and so-called loopholes that the republicans want. you create $1.2 trillion of revenue. you have a trillion dollars of savings from some stuff that happened already last year, do some stuff on defense, you could get the $4 trillion package that we need. it's not hard. you just have two sides that are so polarized, have dug themselves into such deep corners, and just seem unwilling to get out of them. >> it will get done. remember i told you that. >> from donnie's lips. >>> let's get to some of your charteds here because katty asked you what happens if we do go over the cliff. let's look at some of the real consequences. the uncertainty index is your first one. >> as i said, we don't know what happens, but there's a few indicators that give us a sense as to at least where people, business and the economy is at the moment. one interesting index that i came upon is called the uncertainty index. it's done by several economists where they attempt to incorporate the number of news stories t
to hold middle class tax cuts hostage simply because they don't want tax rates on upper income folks to go up. all right? that doesn't make sense. >> reporter: mr. obama's opening bid includes $1.6 trillion in new revenue, about half coming from higher rates for the wealthy. 600 billion in cuts to domestic programs like medicare. and 50 billion in new infrastructure spending. when treasury secretary tim geithner went to the capitol and laid out the plan for a senate republican leading mitch mcconnell, aides on both sides said mcconnell burst out in laughter. with talks now entering the final month, house republicans offer add more somber assessment. >> we're not interested in playing rope a dope. >> it was not a serious proposal. and so right now we're almost nowhere. >> reporter: so alex the clock is ticking. the president's public campaign trying to pressure john boehner, eric cantor and their charges in their house republican conference continues. he meets with governors this week here at the white house to talk about this time and more meetings with ceos, this is in the form of the bus
? >> wouldn't that be nice? how about return to the bill clinton era on capital gains rates? it was bill clinton who pushed it down. now president obama is pushing it way up. yet it would be nice to return to the basis of bill clinton, but that's not what we're doing. we're taking a little bit more here, a little bit more there, a little bit more over there. all to pay for all of this wonderful spending that the president wants. >> steve: maybe in four years when hillary runs for president. you have got to figure that's going to happen. >> i wonder what's going to happen to the economy. it's weak now, you raise taxes a little bit more, what happens to the economy? >> steve: so many people have been forecasting that the president does raise rates, couple of years ago, he said during a recession, that's the worst time to jack up rates. now we're not technically in a recession, but we're in a very soft edge. >> watch out, steve, 'cause here it comes, a little bit more. >> steve: thank you very much. stuart varney doesn't do show tunes, but does talk about the news of the day and politics an
revenue, but here's the key. no rate increases in the top 2% of taxpayers. that's non-negotiable for president obama. >> we're not going to be able to got a deal without it. >> reporter: the white house says the republicans' math just doesn't add up. >> it's magic beans and fairy dust. >> reporter: negotiations have reached a stalemate. >> there's nothing going on privately that is not going on publicly. >> reporter: there is no plan at this time for congressional leaders to meet with the president at the white house, and it doesn't sound like he's sending out invitations any time soon. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. >> reporter: earlier, the president met with the bipartisan group of governors. >> we understand this will be a shared sacrifice, you have to look at spending cuts. states are willing to do more with less. >> the governors didn't endorse a specific proposal, not the white house version or the house republican version, but they did say that something must be done to avoid those massive mandatory spending cuts tha
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6